Sunday, July 21, 2013

scandal at the pottery painting place...no soup for you

Last weekend, I was stressed beyond belief and needed something to occupy my brain, so my friend Carri [Tangent: Seriously, go read her blog now, she's a wordsmith!] invited me to go paint pottery with her and her sweet daughter at Third Coast Clay. located in The Factory in Franklin [Tangent: I love a good art and/or craft, so why have I never gone to one of these places before? I have definitely painted pottery before, but it was always a misshapen coil pot from high school art class. In those pieces, the artful glaze application technique was somewhat lost, because the vessel itself looked akin to a pile of shiny purple turds.]  Because I am a fan of anything that involves a plethora of colors and brushes,  I pretty much loved the whole experience and found it extremely relaxing. My mother came with us and she was all, "I wanna come back every week!"

Since I have a tendency to hoard coffee mugs, I opted to really branch into crazytown and paint a soup mug! [Tangent: Woah. Wild card!] Naturally, I could think of only one way to decorate something to hold my chowdah!


Who doesn't love a very outdated Seinfeld reference? I loved it so much, and loved it even more when Carri dropped it off at my house yesterday afternoon [Tangent: My robot car gave out on me the other day, so I am kinda at the mercy of others to run my errands for me while it's at MobilityWorks being diagnosed.] A spin in the kiln made it all shiny, which of course made it look more polished and less like a pinterest project gone sour.


As she dropped my cute little potbellied mug off at my house, Carri told me that the girls that worked there had hidden it in the back and turned it towards the wall upside down, like the red headed stepchild of the pottery circuit.  After presenting them with my receipt and talking to about 3 different individuals to locate my piece, they finally asked my pal to describe it for them. The young girls that were working there looked unsettled after Carri explained it was the one that said "Soup Nazi" on the front, and they promptly found it sitting in the proverbial "time out" corner. [Tangent: Apparently, I'm realizing that if you were born in the 90s, a Seinfeld reference may be lost on you. The cashier likely was horrifed imagining it belonged to a proud anti-semite who really loves chili. Trust my piece was adorned with polka dots and swirls and not swastikas, so I thought the intent was clearly playful and not racist.] It made me feel extremely ancient to think there is a generation of people that will not understand pop culture references. Seinfeld it still on in reruns, kiddos! Turn off Pretty Little Liars, and get cultured.

16 comments:

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    1. I am only sorry I put my friend through the scrutiny and judgement of being a nazi sympathizer

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  2. Thank you for the shout out!! The minor discomfort I felt at having to repeat the word 'Nazi' over and over in a public place was definitely outweighed not only by the joy of getting to see our works of art in finished form, but also the mouth-watering awe of viewing that $250,000 McClaren that was in the parking lot at the Factory when I arrived. Now I just need to make you some more soup for your anti-Semitic soup mug!

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    1. how many times do you get to shout that in a public place?!?

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  3. One time I said, "the dingo ate your baby" to my students and got TOTAL blank stares. I said, "hello, Seinfeld" and then one of my seniors said, "oh my parents like that show". Ugh, I felt 100.

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    1. I imagine if I taught high school that i would feel geriatric on a daily basis. I shudder when I realize people can drink that were born in the 90s.

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  4. LOL! I feel like "soup nazi" is still so ubiquitous, that even if you don't know what it's referencing, you should have heard it somewhere, and at least know it as "a thing." But, apparently, I'm wrong about that...

    I teach middle school ESL. That means there's a generation gap AND a cultural gap between my students and me. They never get my references! I finally decided to be the Muhammad to their mountain, and started watching Univision and stuff like that. I'm getting better at making the occasional reference they'll actually get. :)

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    1. I think it should be! But h think a lot of things are ubiquitous until I realize some people don't watch TV or read US Weekly all the time.

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  5. I LURVE a good painted mug, especially if it's ginormous! Sorry I don't get the Seinfeld reference. Tried to get into it, just never got me hooked :(

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    1. I, to be honest, was never a huge fan when it originally aired...i remember skipping it after friends...but now I have a fondness for it and its just such a part of culture.

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  6. "The cashier likely was horrifed imagining it belonged to a proud anti-semite who really loves chili. " LAUGHS. AND LAUGHS. AND LAUGHS. I still think it's funny. And the cup turned out pretty, in spite of its controversial beginnings!!

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    1. part of me wishes i was there in person to see this go down. Ugh. I always miss the good stuff.

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  7. LOVE LOVE LOVE! This kind of thing happens to me ALL the time. I work with many people who were born in the 90's and missed out on all of the amazing pop culture references I make on a daily basis, which are followed by blank stares. OY! I think I'm now going to copy your brilliant soup mug idea and go to the EXACT same place to paint it -- can't wait to see their reaction! =)

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    1. If you do, please invite me to tag along so I can see their looks of horror. Also, because I just friggin love painting pottery!

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